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What The Heck Is A Rolled Curb?

Did you know that there are several different types of curbs? Barrier curbs, integral curbs, and rolled curbs, to name a few.

Let’s talk about rolled curbs.

Most driveway curbs have a flatter design to allow a car to easily drive over them. A rolled curb isn't one of them. Rolled curbs maintain the same height as the barrier curbs surrounding them, but they're softer and more "rolled" than barrier curbs. They have a slanted design (rather than the vertical design you’d find in many old-fashioned curbs) that makes it easier for a car to drive over them. But they still send a jolt through your car as you enter or exit your driveway.

While rolled curbs are designed for vehicles to drive over them, they’re not an ideal solution. Constantly driving over a rolled curb can wreak havoc on your drivetrain, suspension system, and other parts under your car. They can create a whole slew of problems, including underbody scrapes and bad wheel alignment. The good news is that you can install a driveway ramp (like a BRIDJIT ramp) to alleviate the problems caused by a rolled curb.

Examples of Rolled Curbs

If you’re more of a visual person, we’ve got you covered. Here are some pictures of rolled curbs to give you a better idea of what they are:

Rolled Curbs Vs. Barrier Curbs

People often confuse a rolled curb for a barrier curb. It’s understandable, since both curbs are incredibly similar.

While both rolled curbs and barrier curbs don’t have a flatter design to allow for easy access, barrier curbs are harder to drive over than rolled curbs. It’s because barrier curbs have a vertical, 90-degree design and rolled curbs have a slanted design. Barrier curbs (also called straight curbs) are typically built alongside roads and are designed to prevent vehicles from leaving the pavement.

If you have any more questions about what a rolled curb is and/or how it differs from a barrier curb, you’re more than welcome to contact us via Twitter, Facebook, or our contact form.